work-life-balance

Sharing is Caring! Believing in the same, Kritika Harjai, an avid blogger at CareerBuilder India shares RELEVANT information and QUICK TIPS on job hunting, getting through interviews, coming with the RIGHT resume and a lot more through her blogs at The Career Muse. Not just this, she even brings the churned out industry insights from the HR experts and head hunters for her readers to get the idea what the industry is looking for. To get her latest blogs in your inbox, subscribe to the Career Muse or follow her on Twitter @KritikaHarjai

Be it devoting extra work hours or staying connected with work after office via smartphones, it means same; ultimately you are cutting off yourself from your personal life. Doing this once a month is alright but if this has become the need of the hour and you have started feeling that this is the only option, then you might soon see the consequences of poor worklife balance.

On this same, Career Builder India recently did a survey to find out how your family/kids feel when you fail achieving a good worklife balance. The results are shocking! Yes, 46 per cent of working parent’s state they have been asked to work less by at least one of their children. In addition, 40 per cent of parents feel their work has negatively affected their relationship with their children.

Before I share the complete report, first I would advice you to take this quiz and see what is your status.

I am assuming you have taken this quiz, hopefully you now know what your work-life balance status is.

Have a look at the results of online survey, which included 288 working mothers and 344 working fathers with children 18 years old and younger who are living at home with them.

Creating a Better Worklife Balance

When asked how many hours they get to spend with their children, 40 per cent of respondents said it was less than three hours per day. And for some, a high salary doesn’t compare to the price of quality time with family. Over half of working mums (52per cent) and 46 per cent of working dads said they would be willing to take a pay cut to spend more time with their children.

Leaving the Workforce

Women are slightly more likely to leave the workforce should the right circumstances present themselves. Forty percent of mums said they were likely to leave their job if their spouse or significant other made enough money for the family to live on comfortably, compared with just over one third (35 per cent) of dads.

Can Working Mums and Dads Have It All?

When it comes to “having it all” the majority of working parents are optimistic. Eighty-five per cent of male workers and 86 per cent of female workers believe they can achieve success in both their career and parenthood.

On the same, Premlesh Machama, MD, CareerBuilder India, shared his suggestions. He said, “Traditionally, men have been expected to be the breadwinners for their households, but the dynamic is shifting. While 79 per cent of working dads remain their family’s sole financial provider, now 40 per cent of working mum’s provide the only salary for their household.”

Also Read:  From Gen Y’s Perspective: What’s Wrong with Moonlighting?

Premlesh offers the following tips for working parents to create a better work/life balance:

  • Don’t be a slave to the traditional 9-to-5: Get more flexibility in your schedule with an alternative work arrangement. Ask your manager about options like flexible working or working from home
  • Learn to say no: You can’t be everything to everyone all the time. Know what your priorities are and don’t be afraid to say no to things that will interfere with those priorities
  • Make time for yourself: You’re no good to anyone if you’re not taking care of yourself. Schedule time each day dedicated to relaxing and recharging
( 213 visits )